Strange But True Aviation News

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Editor’s note: I am frightfully behind with “Strange,” so for the next few weeks I’ll be posting older stories until I catch up. But still, please enjoy! xoxo Aunt Benét

Dude, where’s my clubs? PGA player Ross Henley’s golf  clubs were lost on a United Airlines flight on the way to the Masters Tournament in Augusta, Georgia, reports CNBC.  United, the official airline of the PGA Tour, returned the clubs in time, but it’s not the first time they’ve lost a pro golfer’s clubs. While they offer a Bag VIP program, they stated that no one bag is more important than another.

Hands off my junk! Two Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screeners at Denver International Airport were fired after they were caught staging pat downs of attractive male travelers, reports CNN. The scam worked by a screener inputting that a female was walking through the screening machine, which would flag an anomaly in the groin area, thereby prompting further investigation.  An anonymous tip was given by another TSA screener.

Can’t we all just get along? Ottawa Fury pro soccer player Oliver Minatel found himself at the receiving end of a fellow passenger who tried to strangle him with the cord of his headphones, reports the Globe and Mail. The player wasn’t injured and the unruly passenger was transported for a medical and mental evaluation.

They were mad as hell! Passengers on a Virgin Atlantic flight from Las Vegas to London found themselves staying a bit longer than expected — 33 hours longer, reports the Telegraph. The flight, scheduled to leave on a Monday, suffered what the newspaper called a series of “excruciating” delays before it finally departed on a Wednesday morning. Passengers were given the required $681 in compensation for the delay, along with a hotel for one night, but were forced to sleep in the airport on the second night. They formed a Facebook group to sue the airline for more.

Sometimes you just need a nap. Video has been posted of a man who fell asleep on the baggage claim conveyor belt at Domodedovo Airport in Russia, reports the Telegraph.

Time for “change.” The TSA says it found $674,000 in loose change in 2014, a $36,000 increase from 2013, reports The Hill.  If money is left and not claimed, it stays with the TSA. And a CNN analysis of passenger property loss claims filed with the TSA from 2010 to 2014 shows 30,621 claims of missing valuables, mostly packed in checked luggage. The rest occurred at security checkpoints. Total property loss claimed: $2.5 million.

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