Your Weekend Reads for March 17, 2017

Photos by Benet J. Wilson

Photos by Benet J. Wilson

Wall Street is becoming apprehensive as United Airlines and American Airlines announced plans to add seats on key routes, reports Skift. United will boost capacity by up to 4.5 percent, while American is adding nine new routes. “It’s just this sense by investors that we keep adding more and more capacity, and they’re somewhat frustrated,” said Cowen and Co. analyst Helane Becker in the Skift article.

In June 2016, United Airlines held a big event in New York City to unveil Polaris, its new international business class inflight and ground product, which I covered for Airways magazine. I also covered the Nov. 30 opening of the first Polaris Lounge, located at the airline’s Chicago O’Hare International Airport hub. One of the key pieces on display at both events was the new Polaris seat, designed by Acumen Design Associates and PriestmanGoode, that offers direct aisle access, a 180-degree flat-bed recline and up to 6’6” of bed space.

A set of United Airlines Polaris seats. Photo courtesy of United

A set of United Airlines Polaris seats. Photo courtesy of United

But United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz is reported to be unhappy with manufacturer Zodiac, which blamed “industrial issues” in the UK that were causing “significant disruptions and delays,” with building the Polaris seat reports Brian Sumers of Skift. A few of the carrier’s new Boeing 777-300ERs have been delivered in the past three months with the new seats, but no existing aircraft have been retrofitted.

United’s Star Alliance partner Lufthansa has announced that it plans to unveil a new business class product for its own operations, along those of subsidiaries Swiss and Austrian Airlines, reports John Walton of the Runway Girl Network. Walton was “underwhelmed” with the German flag carrier’s business class product on the Airbus A350, “so it’s certainly a positive to hear that there are plans for a new seat in play,” he wrote.

In the back of the plane, British Airways announced plans to cut the seat pitch on its fleet of Airbus A320s and A321s from 30 to 29 inches, reports the Telegraph. Under the change, BA will offer the same seat pitch as low-cost competitor EasyJet, but other  Ryanair still offers 30 inches of pitch. The UK flag carrier says it made the move to better compete with Europe’s low-cost airlines and offer lower airfares.

A TSA screener at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

A TSA screener at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

Remember last spring when we faced record-long lines at Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport checkpoints? I certainly do, as I covered here for About.com Air Travel. Chicago is home to O’Hare and Midway airports, which were not spared from the long lines. Consumer travel writer Christopher Elliott asks in the Chicago Tribune: Will the long airport lines of spring break 2016 be back again this year? In response to last year’s chaos, TSA created a 10-point plan that sped up lines by the end of the summer. It held during the winter holidays, with TSA estimating that 99 percent of air travelers waited in security lines for less than half an hour and that 95 percent waited less than 15 minutes, Elliott wrote. But will it hold?

Speaking of security, when I signed up for the Clear registered traveler program, I had to submit my fingerprints and do an iris scan. Fortune magazine writes about how Tascent, a California-based company that makes current generation iris-­recognition machines, is hoping to see more of this technology in airports. Iris scanning could be used for tasks including matching travelers to documents including boarding passes or passports.

A Korean Air Boeing 747 parked at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

A Korean Air Boeing 747 parked at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge fan of the Boeing 747 jumbo jet. It was the first aircraft I ever flew on (Pan Am from JFK to London Heathrow Airport) and it’s part of my Aviation Queen logo. But with more efficient and two-engined aircraft available to airlines, the Queen of the Skies is gradually being removed from commercial carriers’ fleets. “The 747 was a fabulous airplane,” Scott Hamilton, founder of aviation consulting firm Leeham Co. LLC told the Los Angeles Times. “But like any technology, it moves on.”

We’ll end the week with a touch of airline luxury. Did you know that Lufthansa has an entire First Class Terminal at its Frankfurt Airport hub? The airline’s best customers completely bypass the main airport, instead driving to the building where the clear security and immigrations, relax in the terminal, then get driven directly to their plane, reports Fortune magazine. Contributor Doug Gollan offered up a photo tour of the facility.

Because there was much more news that happened this week, here are five more stories you should read this weekend. Enjoy!

17096557489_f0c56cdd15_kEDITOR’S NOTE: Benét J. Wilson is a freelance aviation/travel writer based in Baltimore who is available for your writing and branded content/content marketing projects. She’s the Air Travel Expert for About.com. Follow her travel-related magazines on Flipboard: Best of About Travel, a joint curation venture with her fellow About Travel Experts; Travel-Go! There’s Nothing Stopping You, all about the passenger experience on the ground and in the air; and Aviation Geek, a joint magazine sharing everything you need to know about the commercial aviation industry. Check out her travel-related boards on Pinterest and follow her on Twitter at @AvQueenBenet, on her Aviation Queen Facebook Page and on Instagram at aviationqueen.

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