Tag Archives: aircraft

Strange But True Aviation News

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This was a “slipper-y” slope. An Indian member of parliament has been banned from flying the country’s major airlines after confessing to hitting an Air India flight attendant 25 times with a slipper, reports the Guardian. The MP said the thrashing came about on a flight from Pune to New Delhi after he accused the flight attendant of insulting him.  

A picture is worth a thousand words — but not the wrong one. Lithuania created a tourism program using the slogan “Real is beautiful.” But a problem arose when it was discovered that some of the photos used in the campaign were actually taken in Finland and Slovakia, reports DW.com. The tourism chief resigned after the photos went viral on social media.

You can’t take that past security. A worker at St. Croix Airport plead guilty to drug smuggling after being caught trying take a bag of cocaine strapped to his leg past the Transportation Security Administration checkpoint, reports the Virgin Islands Free Press. He faces up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $1 million.

Smoke gets in your eyes — at the airport. A live smoke grenade was found by TSA screeners in the carry-on bag of a passenger flying out of Raleigh-Durham International Airport, reports the News & Observer.

A Korean Air Boeing 747 parked at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

Your Weekend Reads for March 17, 2017

Photos by Benet J. Wilson

Photos by Benet J. Wilson

Wall Street is becoming apprehensive as United Airlines and American Airlines announced plans to add seats on key routes, reports Skift. United will boost capacity by up to 4.5 percent, while American is adding nine new routes. “It’s just this sense by investors that we keep adding more and more capacity, and they’re somewhat frustrated,” said Cowen and Co. analyst Helane Becker in the Skift article.

In June 2016, United Airlines held a big event in New York City to unveil Polaris, its new international business class inflight and ground product, which I covered for Airways magazine. I also covered the Nov. 30 opening of the first Polaris Lounge, located at the airline’s Chicago O’Hare International Airport hub. One of the key pieces on display at both events was the new Polaris seat, designed by Acumen Design Associates and PriestmanGoode, that offers direct aisle access, a 180-degree flat-bed recline and up to 6’6” of bed space.

A set of United Airlines Polaris seats. Photo courtesy of United

A set of United Airlines Polaris seats. Photo courtesy of United

But United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz is reported to be unhappy with manufacturer Zodiac, which blamed “industrial issues” in the UK that were causing “significant disruptions and delays,” with building the Polaris seat reports Brian Sumers of Skift. A few of the carrier’s new Boeing 777-300ERs have been delivered in the past three months with the new seats, but no existing aircraft have been retrofitted.

United’s Star Alliance partner Lufthansa has announced that it plans to unveil a new business class product for its own operations, along those of subsidiaries Swiss and Austrian Airlines, reports John Walton of the Runway Girl Network. Walton was “underwhelmed” with the German flag carrier’s business class product on the Airbus A350, “so it’s certainly a positive to hear that there are plans for a new seat in play,” he wrote.

In the back of the plane, British Airways announced plans to cut the seat pitch on its fleet of Airbus A320s and A321s from 30 to 29 inches, reports the Telegraph. Under the change, BA will offer the same seat pitch as low-cost competitor EasyJet, but other  Ryanair still offers 30 inches of pitch. The UK flag carrier says it made the move to better compete with Europe’s low-cost airlines and offer lower airfares.

A TSA screener at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

A TSA screener at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

Remember last spring when we faced record-long lines at Transportation Security Administration (TSA) airport checkpoints? I certainly do, as I covered here for About.com Air Travel. Chicago is home to O’Hare and Midway airports, which were not spared from the long lines. Consumer travel writer Christopher Elliott asks in the Chicago Tribune: Will the long airport lines of spring break 2016 be back again this year? In response to last year’s chaos, TSA created a 10-point plan that sped up lines by the end of the summer. It held during the winter holidays, with TSA estimating that 99 percent of air travelers waited in security lines for less than half an hour and that 95 percent waited less than 15 minutes, Elliott wrote. But will it hold?

Speaking of security, when I signed up for the Clear registered traveler program, I had to submit my fingerprints and do an iris scan. Fortune magazine writes about how Tascent, a California-based company that makes current generation iris-­recognition machines, is hoping to see more of this technology in airports. Iris scanning could be used for tasks including matching travelers to documents including boarding passes or passports.

A Korean Air Boeing 747 parked at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

A Korean Air Boeing 747 parked at Washington Dulles International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge fan of the Boeing 747 jumbo jet. It was the first aircraft I ever flew on (Pan Am from JFK to London Heathrow Airport) and it’s part of my Aviation Queen logo. But with more efficient and two-engined aircraft available to airlines, the Queen of the Skies is gradually being removed from commercial carriers’ fleets. “The 747 was a fabulous airplane,” Scott Hamilton, founder of aviation consulting firm Leeham Co. LLC told the Los Angeles Times. “But like any technology, it moves on.”

We’ll end the week with a touch of airline luxury. Did you know that Lufthansa has an entire First Class Terminal at its Frankfurt Airport hub? The airline’s best customers completely bypass the main airport, instead driving to the building where the clear security and immigrations, relax in the terminal, then get driven directly to their plane, reports Fortune magazine. Contributor Doug Gollan offered up a photo tour of the facility.

Because there was much more news that happened this week, here are five more stories you should read this weekend. Enjoy!

17096557489_f0c56cdd15_kEDITOR’S NOTE: Benét J. Wilson is a freelance aviation/travel writer based in Baltimore who is available for your writing and branded content/content marketing projects. She’s the Air Travel Expert for About.com. Follow her travel-related magazines on Flipboard: Best of About Travel, a joint curation venture with her fellow About Travel Experts; Travel-Go! There’s Nothing Stopping You, all about the passenger experience on the ground and in the air; and Aviation Geek, a joint magazine sharing everything you need to know about the commercial aviation industry. Check out her travel-related boards on Pinterest and follow her on Twitter at @AvQueenBenet, on her Aviation Queen Facebook Page and on Instagram at aviationqueen.

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Strange But True Aviation News

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What’s wrong with this plug? The Point Me to the Plane blog posted a funny video of airline passengers trying to plug their electronics into fake power outlet stickers. Hilarity ensues!

President Trump is no joking matter. A self-described celebrity dentist claims he was kicked off an American Airlines flight from Los Angeles to New York after he made a Trump immigration joke before the plane took off, reports the Hollywood Reporter. He was put on a later flight.

Fighting really bites! A man lost four teeth and had his jaw broken after being hit by a co-worker at Lehigh Valley International Airport, reports the Morning Call. The co-worker was charged with aggravated assault and harassment and released on $50,000 bail.

He should have left the gun at home. A guitarist for a rock band was fined $1,000 after carrying a loaded handgun on a Delta Air Lines flight from  Mexico to Atlanta, reports Philly Voice. He argued that he had carried the gun on flights “30 to 50 times a year” with no problem.

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! I know this isn’t aviation related, but I just *had* to share this video that happened at an Amtrak station somewhere in New York state. Enjoy!

 

Qatar Airways' new QSuite business class seat. Photo courtesy of Qatar Airways

Your Weekend Reads for March 10, 2017

The roll-out of the Boeing 737 MAX 9. Photo courtesy of Boeing

It was a busy week for Boeing. The Seattle-based manufacturer received certification for its 737 MAX 8 and rolled out the 737 MAX 9 this week, as reported by Airways magazine here and here. But in an interview with Bloomberg, Air Lease Co. CEO John Plueger is pushing Boeing to give the green light to a 737 MAX 10, which would fill a gap in its product line equal to the Airbus A321neo, which is racking up orders.

Airports Council International-North America says the nation’s airports have nearly $100 billion in infrastructure needs between 2017 and 2021 to accommodate growth in passenger and cargo activity, rehabilitate existing facilities and support aircraft innovation, according to its Airport Infrastructure Needs: 2017-2021 report. The $20 billion in average annual infrastructure funding needs for U.S. airports is more than double the funding currently available through annual airport generated net income via Passenger Facility Charge user fees and Airport Improvement Program grants, says the report.

Last week, U.S. airline CEOs had the Big Three Middle East carriers in their crosshairs during the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Aviation Summit, reports Airways magazine. Etihad Group CEO James Hogan announced his departure in January after the carrier was hit with heavy losses caused by a global expansion via investing in more than half a dozen airlines around the world, according to Business Insider. And now Emirates CEO Tim Clark spoke about a “gathering storm” as his airline sees strong competition on its routes by low-cost carriers including Singapore Airlines’ Scoot and Norwegian Air, reports Bloomberg. When asked about changing Emirates’ widebody fleet to better compete, he said while he didn’t see any immediate changes, he did note that  “others coming behind may take a different view,” which was seen as a strong hint that his days in the top spot may be coming to an end.

Skift reports that as Emirates, Etihad and Qatar Airways deal with economic hardship and low oil prices, labor and service cuts are coming soon. Known for the over-the-top amenities offered to their top customers, Skift noted six areas where the three airlines may cut service, including lounges, food and beverage and aircraft orders.

Qatar Airways' new QSuite business class seat. Photo courtesy of Qatar Airways

But Qatar Airways isn’t going down without a fight.  The Runway Girl Network’s John Walton reports on the carrier unveiling its new business class seat, the QSuite. The seat offers families or other groups of four a convertible space a forwards-backwards staggered design that enables fully flat beds with direct aisle access for every passenger — with doors. The seat was unveiled at this week’s ITB Berlin trade show.

On January 10, 2001, American Airlines announced that it was buying the assets of troubled iconic carrier TWA for $500 million. And 16 years after that transaction, American — acquired by US Airways on Feb. 14, 2013 — is now being sued by three former TWA pilots over how the carrier handled a contractual dispute that could see at least 85 pilots demoted from captain to first officer, reports the Dallas Morning News. After the merger, instead of integrating TWA’s pilots into its seniority list, American just tacked 1200 of them to the bottom of the list. Changes were made to alleviate some of this, but they went by the wayside after American’s Chapter 11 filing in 2011, and its subsequent merger with US Airways.

A passenger being screened at Boston-Logan International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

A passenger being screened at Boston-Logan International Airport. Photo by Benet J. Wilson

I flew down to Fort Lauderdale this week to visit Spirit Airlines. I used Clear for my ID check and went immediately into the TSA PreCheck line. As walked through the metal detector, the device went off despite me knowing I didn’t have any metal in my pockets. I learned that I had been tagged for a random extra screening. But it wasn’t a normal pat-down. In fact it was what TSA is calling “a pat-down that is more involved,” reports Lifehacker. The TSA has warned airport officials, crew, and law enforcement that the new procedure “may involve an officer making more intimate contact than before.” I’ll just say my pat-down was pretty intimate, although the officer was very professional and told me exactly what she was doing during the process.

Here are my six picks for more stories you should read over the weekend. Enjoy!

17096557489_f0c56cdd15_kEDITOR’S NOTE: Benét J. Wilson is a freelance aviation/travel writer based in Baltimore who is available for your writing and branded content/content marketing projects. She’s the Air Travel Expert for About.com. Follow her travel-related magazines on Flipboard: Best of About Travel, a joint curation venture with her fellow About Travel Experts; Travel-Go! There’s Nothing Stopping You, all about the passenger experience on the ground and in the air; and Aviation Geek, a joint magazine sharing everything you need to know about the commercial aviation industry. Check out her travel-related boards on Pinterest and follow her on Twitter at @AvQueenBenet, on her Aviation Queen Facebook Page and on Instagram at aviationqueen.

Strange But True Aviation News

strange store

Armrest wars. Inc. magazine reports on a fight between two lawyers on a Monarch Airlines flight from London to Malaga, Spain. One lawyer took exception when the other fell asleep and intruded on their shared armrest, which led to a shoving match.

You should have checked that map. A British Airways flight from London City Airport to New York JFK — with a stop in Ireland — had to stay overnight after the pilots realized that maps to the U.S. hadn’t been downloaded, reports the Sun. Passengers stayed overnight in Ireland and continued on their flight.

Thin — and young — is in. Russia’s Aeroflot, in an attempt to revamp its image, is allegedly removing “old, fat ugly” flight attendants from higher-paying international flights, reports Radio Free Europe. The airline didn’t comment, but a flight attendant said she was told that “only the young and thin will fly abroad for Aeroflot.”

That landing gear might be handy. An Air India flight from Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport to Cochin was forced to make an emergency landing and was delayed for four hours after two engineers “forgot” to remove pins from the landing gear of the flight, reports Scroll.in. If the pins are not removed, the wheels cannot be retracted while the plane is in flight. The engineers were relieved of their duties while the airline investigates.

Some extra seats would have been nice. A Pakistan International Airlines Boeing 777 flight (with 409 seats) between Karachi and Medina, Saudi Arabia, took off with seven passengers who did not have anywhere to sit, reports Inc. So they ended up sitting in the aisles instead of the carrier turning around and removing the extra passengers.