Tag Archives: Delta Air Lines

Random Aviation Photo

Back in April 2011, I went to Atlanta to do stories on Delta Air Lines and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport for Aviation Week and Space Technology magazine. When I worked at Delta, one of my favorite places to hang out was the Delta Flight Museum.  Below is a shot of me sitting in front of the engine of the Spirit of Delta, a Boeing 767. Enjoy!

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Random Aviation Photo

In October 2013, I went down to Atlanta for a journalism conference. I came early so I could get a tour of the International Terminal at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Part of that tour was the Delta Sky Club, which features an outdoor seating and bar area. I had the chance to take a seat, sip a cocktail and watch the planes go by. Below is a shot I took on the patio. Enjoy!

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The Best Of Aviation Queen: 5 Reasons Why I’m Glad The Delta Worldport Is Dead

Editor’s note: I’m taking the week off for vacation, so check out some of my favorite blog posts of 2013. I caused quite a stir when I went against the preservationists who wanted to stop Delta from tearing down its Terminal 3 at JF Airport. The post below first appeared on the blog on May 28. Enjoy!
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Delta Air Lines Terminal 3, JFK Airport. Photo courtesy of LI Refugee, via Flickr.

The chatter on the imminent closing of Delta Air Lines’ Terminal 3 — AKA the Third Worldport — was high leading up to the last flight on May 23.  There are those who wax poetic about the glory days, when it was the Pan Am Worldport.  And there was the glory — the first Boeing 747 flight; the first use of jetbridges; the unique flying saucer roof design; and the Panorama Room dining facility.

After Pan Am died in 1991, Delta took over the facility, and it’s been in decline ever since.  And now, despite the best efforts of the group Save The Worldport, the building s scheduled to be demolished by 2014.  Goodbye and good riddance, I say.  Below are my five reasons why.

  1. Delta had to do it. The airline has invested heavily in New York, and Terminal 3 was not a welcoming facility, with flying birds, a dated interior, limited concessions and a “dark and dank” aesthetic.
  2. Terminal 3 was the last of the Mohicans. Every other terminal at JFK Airport has been renovated in the last 10 years, and this was crimping Delta’s style in the battle over New York City area customers.
  3. Terminal 3 was beyond saving. I remember when JetBlue wanted to build its own new terminal and tried to make the iconic TWA Flight Center work, but modern needs just couldn’t be adapted to the historic building. So they built T5 from scratch. Delta was even smarter, building onto the existing T4.
  4. T4 is a BIG win for Delta customers.  I recently did an interview for a freelance article with Henry Kuykendall, the airline’s vice president of Airport Customer Service, and he was brimming with excitement on all the passenger amenities in T4.
  5. The history is gone. The good folks at Save The Worldport argue that T3′s unique flying saucer design puts it in the same league as the Eero Saarinen-designed TWA Flight Center.  But there have been so many design changes to T3, it will be very tough to get the historic designation that the TWA building has.

I give a hat tip to the Flying With Fish and Airchive blogs for their posts on the closing of T3.

An Early Christmas Present To Me From Delta Air Lines and Southwest Airlines

Editor’s note: After this post was published, I received a very nice note from two blog readers: marketing guru David Parmet of Marketing Begins At Home and good friend Jenny Dervin, who heads up the communications shop for JetBlue. They both asked that I mention that JetBlue will also keep the cell phone ban in place. I’m a big fan of the airline, and my biggest gripe is that they don’t have more service from Baltimore. Maybe another present for me is coming? 🙂

Regular readers of this blog know exactly how I feel about allowing travelers to chat on their cell phones inflight — I compare it to another circle of hell. I mean, really — do you *really* need to have that loud conversation, annoying your fellow passengers?

So I’ve decided that my former employer, Delta, and my current airline of choice, Southwest, decided to give me an early Christmas present.  According to Terry Maxson of the Dallas Morning News, the CEOs of both carriers said that even if the Federal Communications Commission allows folks to chat away at 40,000 feet, they will not lift the current cell phone ban.

I’m not alone. This Politico story cites an Associated Press-GkF survey that found 59% of those who have flown at least once this year are against inflight cell phones. It rises to a whopping 79% opposed among those who flew at least four times this year.

I always tell my daughter that I reward good behavior. Now my travel budget isn’t going to amount to much in the greater scheme of things with these airlines but if the FCC lifts the cell phone ban, you can bet that Delta, and Southwest and JetBlue will get most of my business.  Merry Christmas!!

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