Tag Archives: journalist

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370: Who The Media Should Be Calling

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A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 departing from Zurich International Airport. Photo courtesy of Aero Icarus via Flickr.

I have been sitting here in Baltimore watching the ongoing general media coverage of what happened to Flight 370 with a mx of bemusement and outright horror.  My phone has been ringing off the hook and my email inbox has been bombarded with media organizations from around the globe asking me to comment on the ongoing saga.

This shows me how desperate the general media are to find  experts to theorize on what might have happened to the Boeing 777 and its 239 passengers. Aviation accidents are one of the areas I don’t feel comfortable commenting on as a “media” expert. But after more than 20 years in the aviation business, there are a cadre of great aviation journalists that the general media SHOULD be calling, and I’ve listed them below. Put them on speed dial!

Jon OstrowerWall Street Journal: Before Ostrower, a Chicago-based aerospace reporter, came to the Journal, he was the air transport editor for FlightGlobal. Before that, he wrote the independent Flightblogger blog, considered the source of information on all things Boeing aircraft. He’s forgotten more than most of us know about the Seattle aircraft manufacturer.

Rob Mark, Jetwhine.com and Aviation International News:  besides being a licensed commercial pilot and the writer of the safety section of AIN, Mark has flown every current commercial aircraft from the Airbus A380 on down. He speaks regularly on aviation issues for FOX News and can do the same for you.

Christine Negroni, freelance aviation journalist: Negroni was on my original top 10 list. She’s written about aviation and safety for publications including the New York Times, Huffington Post, the Dallas Morning News and all the major television networks. She also covered aviation for CNN and wrote a book about the crash of TWA Flight 800. – See more at: http://www.aviationqueen.com/?s=speed+dial#sthash.XewmrFZz.dpuf

 

Graham Warwick and Guy Norris, Aviation Week and Space Technology: my former colleagues have been in the business for decades. Warwick, AvWeek’s managing editor for technology, has a strong background in aircraft engineering and design. Senior Editor Norris is a long-time, respected aerospace journalist who has written books on aircraft manufacturers, including Boeing.

Stephen Trimble, FlightGlobal: Trimble, FlightGlobal’s Americas Editor,  is one of the pre-eminent aerospace and aviation editors in the field.

Frank Jackman, Flight Safety Foundation: my former Aviation Week colleague covered the overhaul and maintenance side of aviation for more than 20 years. He is now Editor-in-Chief of AeroSafety World magazine and director of publications at the foundation. – See more at: http://www.aviationqueen.com/?s=speed+dial#sthash.XewmrFZz.dpuf

Another Five Aviation Journalists To Have On Speed Dial For Plane Crashes

Yesterday, I did a blog post on five aviation journalists you need on speed dial to discuss plane crashes. Once it was posted, and once I put links to the post on Facebook and Twitter, social media exploded and folks were kind enough to throw out more names.  So below are another five names to put in the Rolodex.

  1. Christine Negroni, freelance aviation journalist: Negroni was on my original top 10 list. She’s written about aviation and safety for publications including the New York Times, Huffington Post, the Dallas Morning News and all the major television networks. She also covered aviation for CNN and wrote a book about the crash of TWA Flight 800.
  2. Mary Silitch, contributing editor, Aviation International News: Silitch is a pioneer for female aviation journalists.  From the time she joined Flying magazine in 1965 to her almost-nomination to the National Transportation Safety Board by President Bill Clinton, to flying more than 250 aircraft types, she is a font of information.
  3. Miles O’Brien, science correspondent, PBS Newshour: Many of us know O’Brien for his 17 years of covering aviation and science for CNN.
  4. Frank Jackman, Flight Safety Foundation: my former Aviation Week colleague covered the overhaul and maintenance side of aviation for more than 20 years. He is now Editor-in-Chief of AeroSafety World magazine and director of publications at the foundation.
  5. Jason Rabinowitz, associate editor, NYCAviation: Rabinowitz is on the team at the highly respected NYCAviation news site.  He is a lawyer and the website’s lead writer, and is currently covering the Asiana accident.

Other names inlude Jay Donoghue, retired editor of Air Transport World magazine and AeroSafety World; Amy Laboda, a pilot and Editor-In-Chief of Aviation for Women magazine; Sean Broderick, Editor, Maintenance, Repair Overhaul & Airworthiness at Aviation Week; Jason Paur, pilot and writer, Wired’s Autopia blog; Chad Trautvetter, a pilot and news editor for Aviation International News; John Croft, a pilot and senior editor for avionics and safety at Aviation Week; Bill Carey, senior editor,  Aviation International News; and Ramon Lopez, former editor, Air Safety Week.

5 Aviation Journalists You Need On Speed Dial For Plane Crashes

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An Asiana Airlines Boeing 767 parked at Incheon International Airport.  Photo by Benet J. Wilson.

After yesterday’s crash of an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777, I felt the need to do a rare Sunday post.  As an aviation journalist and communicator for 20 years, I’ve seen more than my fair share of general media coverage when it comes to airline accidents.  The crash at San Francisco International Airport showed the sad state of affairs when it comes to covering an accident.

Gone are the days when most major newspapers, television stations and cable news networks had reporters on staff with aviation expertise.  And it showed yesterday. Most of the accurate news came not from my usual news sources — CNN and NPR — but my 10,000 Twitter followers and my network of aviation geeks on private listserves and Facebook.  And the information that was out there was either wrong, or highly inaccurate.

For example, an NPR reporter said yesterday that the aircraft involved was a “Boeing 777, seats around 150 people.”  What?? Does this mean NO ONE at NPR had the 30 seconds it would have taken to go to the 777 section of the Boeing or Asiana websites or even SeatGuru.com to see the actual number on the Asiana aircraft? (it’s 246 to 300 seats).

So now here is my public service — a list of five top aviation journalists who can speak intelligently on the Asiana crash and a whole host of other aviation issues.  And bonus — I know that they are all camera-ready. So take advantage of these folks and their years of knowledge.

1.  Rob Mark, Jetwhine.com and Aviation International News:  besides being a licensed commercial pilot and the writer of the safety section of AIN, Mark has flown every current commercial aircraft from the Airbus A380 on down. He speaks regularly on aviation issues for FOX News and can do the same for you.
2 and 3. Graham Warwick and Guy Norris, Aviation Week and Space Technology: my former colleagues have been in the business for decades. Warwick, AvWeek’s managing editor for technology, has a strong background in aircraft engineering and design. Senior Editor Norris is a long-time, respected aerospace journalist who has written books on aircraft manufacturers, including Boeing.
4. Stephen Trimble, FlightGlobal: Trimble, FlightGlobal’s Americas Editor,  is one of the pre-eminent aerospace annd aviation editors in the field. Want proof? Check out what he’s done in the 24 hours since the crash.
5.  Jon Ostrower, Wall Street Journal: Before Ostrower, a Chicago-based aerospace reporter, came to the Journal, he was the air transport editor for FlightGlobal. Before that, he wrote the independent Flightblogger blog, considered the source of information on all things Boeing aircraft. He’s forgotten more than most of us know about the Seattle aircraft manufacturer.